Everything Rhymes With Alcohol

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arte-mysia:

intheindigo:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

I think he’s the man that The 13th Warrior was loosely based upon.

Ahmad ibn Fadlan ibn al-Abbas ibn al Rashid ibn al Hammad traveled through much of the world.  His manuscript for the time that he spent among the Vikings was lost, but his records regarding the Rus and the people’s between Baghdad and Scandinavia still exists.  The 13th Warrior was loosely based on his travels.

Additionally, we know that people from Northern Europe traveled as far south as Egypt during the time of Ramses II.

Basically, the idea that people didn’t travel very much is a very 18th Century invention.

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 15 hours ago with 3571 notes

visticuffs:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

In which fantasy fiction with characters of color is subjected to the “historical accuracy” test and comes out on top once again…

(fyi this is the author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon, which has been featured for Fiction Week previously)

image

This is one (of many) books going on my Intro to Fantasy Lit course I’m teaching this winter.
My only goal is to tear down the idea of the normative white/straight/patriarchal fantasy worlds.
No biggie.

That’s a fantastic goal!

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 15 hours ago with 3571 notes

jamesmdavisson:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

In which fantasy fiction with characters of color is subjected to the “historical accuracy” test and comes out on top once again…

(fyi this is the author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon, which has been featured for Fiction Week previously)

image

So I’ve been in an extended discussion on Facebook now for several days (1600+ words, or 3000+ if you count my blog post to which it is a response) over whether or not representing some of characters from the Bible as black is historically plausible. I think it is, definitely, though it’s not the only plausible way to represent ancient Israelites/Jews. The other guy’s case seems to be grounded in the idea that all national/ethnic groups were completely homogeneous before the 19th century, which I guess is a century that magically allowed all societies to suddenly become diverse. I tried pointing him to Medieval PoC, which is full of evidence directly to the contrary (like the above) to show him just how wrong he was, but I don’t think he noticed. (His full case is that [1] the Jews didn’t start out black [how do we know?!] and [2] since they never intermarried with other people [I call bullshit] they could never be black, so therefore [3] we should just stop trying to “cram everyone into little race boxes.”) 

Anyway, the point is that Medieval PoC is great, will blow your mind if you let it, and has led to me arguing with strangers on the internet. 

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 15 hours ago with 3571 notes

idrawvikings:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

In which fantasy fiction with characters of color is subjected to the “historical accuracy” test and comes out on top once again…

(fyi this is the author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon, which has been featured for Fiction Week previously)

image

Seeing as this has to do with Vikings, I suppose I’m morally obligated to reblog this—plus, in the pop-culture perception of the Vikings, people really tend to play-down the extensive contacts with the Muslim world (I mean, OK, there is 13th Warrior, but I think that’s kind of a complicated and still orientalizing portrayal of things…). Hm, and now that I think about it—Thomas DuBois has a great book on the multi-faith milieu of the Viking age North, in which he primarily covers the interrelationships of Norse, Saami, and Christian beliefs (emphasizing the fact that no culture lives in a vacuum)—can’t remember whether he mentions Islam at all, but it would be interesting to learn more about that. Apart from the issues with our own colonial/post-colonial context, I would imagine that the fact that the main texts we use to study Old Norse mythology were written in the West (Iceland), while it’s the Eastern Vikings from Sweden (the Rus in many sources) who would have had more contact with Islam… (and of course, let’s remember that the word “Viking” is technically not originally an ethnic marker).

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 15 hours ago with 3571 notes
everythingrhymeswithalcohol:

everythingrhymeswithalcohol:

Support Bankuei creating Articles and game aids on tabletop roleplaying games,
"I write about roleplaying games on my blog Deeper in the Game. I try to write mostly about techniques people can use to have more fun with their games - a lot of general tools for any kind of game, sometimes game specific play aids or advice, and sometimes a bit about social aspects of gaming culture. This includes game theory, though I try to keep to things which you can observe or use for play or design and not just random thoughts."

http://www.patreon.com/bankuei

everythingrhymeswithalcohol:

everythingrhymeswithalcohol:

Support Bankuei creating Articles and game aids on tabletop roleplaying games,

"I write about roleplaying games on my blog Deeper in the Game. I try to write mostly about techniques people can use to have more fun with their games - a lot of general tools for any kind of game, sometimes game specific play aids or advice, and sometimes a bit about social aspects of gaming culture. This includes game theory, though I try to keep to things which you can observe or use for play or design and not just random thoughts."

http://www.patreon.com/bankuei

(via cornerstorepress)

— 15 hours ago with 118 notes

plotbunnyfarm:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

In which fantasy fiction with characters of color is subjected to the “historical accuracy” test and comes out on top once again…

(fyi this is the author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon, which has been featured for Fiction Week previously)

image

Also the Ulfberht blades, which were of Indian or Central Asian manufacture, and far superior to anything the Vikings could have made. They were so famous at the time that archaeologists have found knock-off blades of Viking manufacture with misspelled maker’s marks on the blades. The counterfeit Rolex of the 10th century.

History is cool.

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 15 hours ago with 3571 notes

slippingandflipping:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

In which fantasy fiction with characters of color is subjected to the “historical accuracy” test and comes out on top once again…

(fyi this is the author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon, which has been featured for Fiction Week previously)

image

So am I getting it right that there were muslim vikings? Wouldn’t those lifestyles conflict greatly, tho?

Clearly not.

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 15 hours ago with 3571 notes

jonaki:

quoms:

jonaki:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

muslim vikings sound cool and all, but this is hardly a valid argument in defense of multiculturalism today. the fact that there was room for geographical mobility in other historical periods, while very interesting and useful in dispelling myths of “racial/ethnic/religious purity”, says nothing about the multiculturalism discourse in the modern world. various geopolitical, socioeconomic and cultural shifts have taken place since Muslim Vikings and i personally find the above tweet of little relevance to any of our current issues 

also, lets not pretend like viking societies were truly “multicultural” in the way multiculturalism is understood and experienced today

saladin ahmed is a fantasy and science fiction author. his tweet is about ‘multicultural fantasy’ being something that exists in short stories and novels, which often do take place in the early medieval time period or something strongly resembling it

everyone shits on him for writing fantasy stories with islam in them basically because that’s not Reale Mediævalle Tymes and this tweet is a response to that. ‘multicultural’ is the word his critics use because ‘multicultural’ is white nationalist code for ‘brown people and islam’

Ooohh ok my bad then. Didnt realize this refered to fantasy books

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 16 hours ago with 3571 notes

marthacrimson:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

In which fantasy fiction with characters of color is subjected to the “historical accuracy” test and comes out on top once again…

(fyi this is the author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon, which has been featured for Fiction Week previously)

image

"the Long Ships" (Röde Orm) by Frans G Bengtsson is regarded as one of the best novels written in Sweden, published 1941 and 1945 (divided in two parts). Set in the viking age the main character Orm Tostesson, and his friend Toke Grey-Gullson converts to islam and spends part of the story as muslim soldiers. Orm eventually converts to christianity, but Toke remains a muslim for the rest of his life. The story is based on historical facts, and their contact with islam as well conversion is entirely plausible (Frans G Bengtsson did his homework). You’ll also get a good picture on how contact between cultures looked - or could’ve looked. Perhaps not fantasy, but a great read to get multicultural inspiration/counterarguments and to have a good reading moment.

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 16 hours ago with 3571 notes

voodoo-otter:

closetextrovert:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

In which fantasy fiction with characters of color is subjected to the “historical accuracy” test and comes out on top once again…

(fyi this is the author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon, which has been featured for Fiction Week previously)

image

Muslim vikings is the most awesome thing I didn’t know I needed

Also if this isn’t a sign of how far the American educational system has sunk, I don’t know what is. I know it hurts but fantasy literature is not historically accurate, ever, at all. There were never men of great power who could fart fireballs, there were never giant flying lizards that made fun of you for trying to steal their fool’s gold, and there were never horses that don’t try to kill you when you give them weapons. Brown people is like the MOST accurate thing you could put in a fantasy novel.

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 16 hours ago with 3571 notes

froborr:

johnskylar:

froborr:

johnskylar:

froborr:

johnskylar:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

In which fantasy fiction with characters of color is subjected to the “historical accuracy” test and comes out on top once again…

(fyi this is the author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon, which has been featured for Fiction Week previously)

image

Meanwhile, Christian Bale has been cast as Moses and all the white people are like “”.

To be fair, there’s zero evidence Moses ever existed and quite a lot of evidence that most of Exodus was made up, so casting anyone as him is equally historically inaccurate.

Still would’ve been better to cast an Arab Jew, but that goes for every portrayal of pretty much every Biblical character ever except Paul.

1) Saul of Tarsus (Paul) was a Middle Eastern Jew.  Tarsus is on the coast around the junction between Lebanon and Turkey, and at the time Jewish populations hadn’t mixed much with Roman populations, certainly not to the level where Saul would be anything other than a mixture of Semitic and Grecian.  Anyway, it doesn’t really matter—and perhaps you were just saying he’s been played by a POC frequently?  If so, I haven’t seen that.

2) The historicity of the actual person doesn’t matter if you can clearly identify what the person would’ve been.  Whether or not Moses existed, he was almost certainly descended from a mixture of Middle Eastern genotypes.  Jesus probably didn’t exist in specific, but casting a white guy as Jesus is kind of stupid.

3) There isn’t “zero” evidence Moses ever existed.  There is zero evidence corroborating the account in the Bible.  The Bible is a primary source, no matter who wrote it or how divine it is or isn’t.  There are plenty of uncorroborated historical figures.  Most of them are from accounts that probably have a grain of truth.

Careful with those categorical statements, there.

The only source for Moses existing isn’t just uncorroborated, it’s contradicted by the historical record. There is simply no way a series of massive disasters, followed by the mass departure of a large slave population, could have happened without leaving some archeological trace, and Egypt is one of the most thoroughly archeologically studied (and best-preserved) regions on Earth. Meanwhile, Exodus is a very distant secondary source, not primary. The written Torah as we know it did not exist for millennia after the events it depicts purportedly occurred.

The evidence for Jesus’ existence is slightly better, since Josephus mentions him having followers only a few decades after his supposed death. Still, the Gospels are also contradicted by the historical record (there is NO WAY the Romans could have failed to record a province-wide census or a simultaneous earthquake and eclipse), but overall the problems are the same: no mention of him or the story around him in any primary sources, including sources that SHOULD mention the story if it happened.

None of which has any relevance for religious belief and practice, as I’ve argued elsewhere, but it does place the story firmly in the realm of myth and folklore, not history.

And as I said, Moses should be depicted as an Arab Jew, but the reason isn’t historical accuracy, it’s cultural accuracy and sensitivity.

I will admit freely to being mistaken re: Paul; I thought he was Greek. My knowledge of the New Testament is significantly less than the Jewish Bible.

You’re not wrong about Jesus having more potential historicity,* but I wouldn’t totally rule out the possibility that Egypt never experienced what’s described in the Bible.  There are many periods during which the Egyptian historical record is inconsistent and noncontinuous, particularly from the period of the Hyksos takeover through the end of the rule of Horemheb.  In there, there is a lot of opportunity for a slave revolt to have involved some “miraculous” occurrences that gained the force-of-myth.  In history, particularly premodern history, the fact that we don’t know something should never be taken as evidence that it could not have happened.

The plain thing is that these events happen too fast, and history too slowly, for us to ever be 100% sure of anything.  It’s a rough life.

Anyway, all points well made and well take, but I still adopt a certain distance from firmness of fact.

*but let’s also keep in mind that the number of Jewish guys named “Josh” running around, combined with the fact that all Roman historical records in written form have been communicated through the ages by people with a VERY strong tendency towards liberal enhancements of Christian historicity, makes a lot of mentions of Jesus potential redirections of independent people that some monk decided would make a good Jesus.

Well, do note, I said zero evidence that he existed. That’s not the same as saying he definitely didn’t exist. It’s just saying there’s no reason to believe he did.

There is, ultimately, as much evidence for Moses or Jesus as there is for King Arthur, which is to say basically none. The only reason their historicity is treated differently is because our culture is biased toward credulity where Jewish and Christian sacred texts are concerned.

(Also, I misspoke. Exodus is definitely a tertiary source, not secondary—it’s author(s) could not have spoken with or read accounts by people who experienced the events depicted. The time gap is too large. The Gospels are probably also tertiary sources, but it’s possible there were one or more now-lost firsthand accounts they drew on.)

Still, when King Arthur gets portrayed (in major $$ films) by a string of black dudes…

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

— 16 hours ago with 3571 notes
Official Tanzanian Astronaut Potato Salad Kickstarter →

"It seems the good people of Kickstarter have a hankering for potato salad.

So I will create, just for you, a recipe for Tanzanian Astronaut potato salad - which is only experimental, of course, until I, Gideon Gidori, succeed in my efforts to become Tanzania’s first astronaut. (After all, there can be no OFFICIAL Tanzanian Astronaut Potato Salad until there’s a Tanzanian astronaut, right?)

All I need is the funds to get my education so I can get started. Before Mr. Danger gave the internet this potato salad craving, I had been raising money at rally.org/starday - and already I’ve got over $12,000!!! But the truth is, to go to school next year, it will cost about $35,000. So I still need $23,000. And that’s just for next year. Then I’ll have two more years of high school. And then college. Let’s just say Tanzanian Astronaut Potato Salad doesn’t come cheap.

For now, though, I’ve set a starting price of only $10 - after all, anything I make from my potato salad venture will help!! So, people of the interwebs, what’s it worth to you to have potato salad made by the world’s first Tanzanian astronaut?

It’s totally worth it. I’m totally worth it. I promise.”

— 16 hours ago with 1 note
#tanzania  #astronaut  #potato salad  #kickstarter  #do some good 
Official Tanzanian Astronaut Potato Salad Kickstarter →

"It seems the good people of Kickstarter have a hankering for potato salad.

So I will create, just for you, a recipe for Tanzanian Astronaut potato salad - which is only experimental, of course, until I, Gideon Gidori, succeed in my efforts to become Tanzania’s first astronaut. (After all, there can be no OFFICIAL Tanzanian Astronaut Potato Salad until there’s a Tanzanian astronaut, right?)

All I need is the funds to get my education so I can get started. Before Mr. Danger gave the internet this potato salad craving, I had been raising money at rally.org/starday - and already I’ve got over $12,000!!! But the truth is, to go to school next year, it will cost about $35,000. So I still need $23,000. And that’s just for next year. Then I’ll have two more years of high school. And then college. Let’s just say Tanzanian Astronaut Potato Salad doesn’t come cheap.

For now, though, I’ve set a starting price of only $10 - after all, anything I make from my potato salad venture will help!! So, people of the interwebs, what’s it worth to you to have potato salad made by the world’s first Tanzanian astronaut?

It’s totally worth it. I’m totally worth it. I promise.”

— 16 hours ago
#tanzania  #astronaut  #potato salad  #kickstarter  #do some good 
Race in Toyland: A Nonwhite Doll Crosses Over - NYTimes.com →

"These days, any toy whose sales reach several hundred million dollars, as Doc’s have, is considered significant, given the toy industry’s estimated $22 billion business nationwide. In the past, none of the toys based on Tiana, a recent black Disney princess; Little Bill, a television series starring an African-American boy; or even Michael Jackson in the 1980s have enjoyed such a prosperous shelf life as Doc’s, according to the NPD Group, a market research company.

“This is a different stratosphere,” said Jim Silver, editor in chief of TTPM.com, a website that covers toys.

Mr. Silver, along with parents and analysts, suspects that the key to the “Doc McStuffins” success is the TV character, which appeals to parents and children alike. But social and political changes over the last few decades have also broadened customers’ views.

“I don’t know if this character, 15 or 20 years ago, would have been as successful, because the culture has changed, and attitudes have changed,” Mr. Silver said of Doc. “You go back 20 years ago, and does a black president get elected?”

Margaret Beale Spencer, a professor of comparative human development at the University of Chicago whose research has focused on children, race and identity, said children from all backgrounds derive meaningful lessons from their toys.

“Children’s play is serious business,” Dr. Spencer said. “They are getting ideas about who they are from these objects. There are messages about one’s confidence, one’s sense of self in terms of what I look like and being powerful.”

At the same time, she notes that children of different races or ethnicities do view some toys differently. “When little white girls embrace Doc McStuffins, for them Doc McStuffins is a girl, and Doc McStuffins is powerful,” Dr. Spencer said. “For a little black girl, it may be all of those things, but also that she’s black.””

I love that this is happening, but there is also a message that makes me apprehensive. That diverse representation is only worthy of doing because it makes money.

— 1 day ago with 10 notes
#toys  #dolls  #doc mcstuffins  #diversity  #capitalism